Senator Young Says Legislation to Increase Scientific Funding Will Benefit Ag Industry

by | May 6, 2022 | Indiana Agriculture News, News Feed

Senator Todd Young (R-IN) speaking at the Purdue Ag Alumni Fish Fry at the Indiana State Fairgrounds on April 30, 2022. Photo by C.J. Miller / Hoosier Ag Today.

There’s a concern among many lawmakers in Washington, including Sen. Todd Young (R-IN), that China may be outpacing the U.S. when it comes to developing new technology and scientific innovation.  That’s why he says he helped co-sponsor the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act so the U.S. remains competitive with China.

That legislation would provide additional federal funding at research facilities, including those in Indiana.

“This would provide major investment in a number of areas of scientific inquiry,” says Sen. Young.  “Investments in things like next generation technology, artificial intelligence [and] quantum computing.”

During an appearance at the Purdue Ag Alumni Fish Fry at the Indiana State Fairgrounds, Sen. Young says that the federal funds for research into new products and technologies would benefit Indiana farmers and the ag industry.

“Some of these investments will have direct impacts on the way we farm and the way our rural communities adapt to global changes,” according to Sen. Young.

His legislation would also help fund semiconductor chip manufacturing.

The Senate bill, which had passed in Senate by a vote of 68 to 32 on June 8, 2021, is now being reconciled with a similar House bill called The America COMPETES Act of 2022, which passed on Feb. 4, 2022.

Sen. Young says Purdue is already an example of a research leader when it comes to scientific breakthroughs and developing new technology.

“[Purdue] is a world-class university,” says Sen. Young.  “It’s right here in the heartland.  No place in the world is better when it comes to the ag sciences and understanding rural communities.”

Click BELOW to hear C.J. Miller’s report on Senator Todd Young’s legislation to increase scientific funding and how he says it would benefit Indiana farmers and the ag industry.

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